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EdD Sample Curriculum

The Doctor of Education program provides opportunities for you to think critically about what is going on in the field of education, consider multiple perspectives on relevant topics, develop advanced skills in applied research, and investigate practice questions that prepare you to engage in hands-on approaches to change and innovation. Faculty members inspire you to think differently about learning—in ways that will impact your work in the course, your future career, and the work you do in your current profession.

Instructors teach classes online or as part of the required summer residencies at the Boston campus. Our faculty seek out innovative ways to bring the classroom to the students, integrating technologies that foster communication and collaboration between professors and fellow classmates.

The program is designed so you can complete the degree in three years by taking two classes each term, but the timeline is flexible if you choose to take them at your own pace. This sample timeline is based on a student's schedule after receiving 9 credit hours of advanced graduate credit. 

Two start terms available every year. Begin classes in either January, or September.

Sample 1 Sample 2

Year 1: Starting Your Coursework

books icon Classes

residency icon Residency

books icon Thesis

pencil iconTo Do

Each term, you will take one or two classes to complete your coursework. During this time, you will: (1) explore the origins and dimensions of contemporary education; (2) consider theoretical perspectives related to the field; (3) evaluate existing research and conduct empirical research; and (4) begin to develop an empirical investigation related to your “problem of practice” in preparation for writing your doctoral thesis.

During the summer terms of years one and two, you will join your peers and professors in Boston for a one-week intensive experience that combines a coursework component, workshops, and faculty and student presentations. Students live on campus during the week, getting to know one another,  members of the EdD faculty, and administrative team.

Thesis development begins as you and your peers engage with new ideas and conversations about the integration of theory, research, and practice. You will identify an area of interest from your professional practice and have the opportunity to:  (1) explore new ways of thinking about the problem by reviewing existing research; (2) note research questions that remain; (3) frame a researchable question; and (4) develop a research design that enables you to answer the question. Upon coursework completion, you will work independently with an advisor.

Along the way, you will need to review and complete various forms and documents to make sure you stay on track.

Winter

(January–March)

Required Foundation Courses

7209 Introduction to Doctoral Studies

7202 Transforming Human Systems

 

In your first class, "Introduction to Doctoral Studies," you will have the opportunity to integrate theoretical and scholarly knowledge in the development of a researchable problem of practice. If you opt for two courses each term, you also will take Transforming Human Systems (EDU 7202). In this course, you will consider different approaches to and theoretical perspectives on changing systems and transforming practice.

Become acquainted with the EdD Student Resource Center upon acceptance into the program.

Spring

(AprilJune)


Required Foundation Courses

7214 Learning and Human Development

7210 Leadership Theory and Research

Prepare for the summer residency by registering for your hybrid courses and confirming your travel plans.

The foundation courses provide an opportunity to gain a shared, broad platform of knowledge upon which to build your future studies in the EdD.  These courses will set the foundation for you to understand and analyze research topics, information sources, modes of scholarly inquiry, and potential individual research focus areas.

Tip Tip

Make sure to declare your concentration.

Summer

(JulyAugust)

Concentration Courses

Concentration Course 1 (Residency)

Concentration Course 2 (Online)

July

You will join other members from your concentration in taking a hybrid course during the summer term. The eight-week courses begin online, but you will join your classmates for a one-week onsite intensive on the Boston campus. During that time, you will work closely with your peers and professor.

During the residency, class time is coupled with other valuable activities and workshops—creating an immersive experience that will engage you in the doctoral process as it relates to your curriculum and thesis.

Complete your travel arrangements for your residency and prepare to meet with your classmates and faculty while on campus.

Fall

(SeptemberDecember)

 

Required Research Course and Concentration Course

7280 Fundamentals of Research

Concentration Course 3 (Online)

 

The research course sequence provides the necessary skills for you to critically evaluate, design, and conduct research. This sequence is taken alongside courses in your particular concentration. This allows you to engage the research process in a laboratory of practice—settings where theory and practice inform and enrich each other to address complex problems of practice.

Use your degree audit in myNEU and reach out to your program advisor to ensure proper course sequencing.

Year 2: Finishing Your Coursework

 

books icon Classes

residency icon Residency

books icon Thesis

pencil iconTo Do

Winter

(January–March)

Required Research Course and Elective Course

7281 Research Design

Elective

 


At this point, you will be preparing for your thesis proposal.

 

Spring

(AprilJune)

 
Required Research Course and Concentration Course

7283 Proposal Development

Concentration Course 4 (Online)

Prepare for your second summer residency by registering for your hybrid courses and confirming your travel plans. You will continue to develop and write components of your doctoral thesis proposal as part of your coursework.  

Summer

(JulyAugust)

 
Concentration Course

Concentration Course 5 (Residency)

 

July

Your concentration course will begin online at the start of the summer. Then you will travel to Boston for your second weeklong residency for face-to-face instruction.

During your final term of coursework, you will simultaneously continue to develop your thesis proposal.

Tip Tip
You are nearing the end of your coursework. To make sure you are still on track, go through your final degree audit.

Fall

(SeptemberDecember)


Doctoral Thesis Course 1

8796 Thesis Proposal and the Internal Review Board

 

You will receive your advisor assignment during the fall term. While enrolled in the Doctoral Thesis Seminar (EDU 8796), you will work toward completing your thesis with the support of your advisor. At this point, you will share the cumulative work done toward completing your proposal with your advisor and set up a plan for its completion. If the proposal is largely complete, you will prepare to defend it.

 

 

Year 3: Completing Your Thesis

books icon Classes

residency icon Residency

books icon Thesis

pencil iconTo Do

Winter

(January–March)

Doctoral Thesis Course 2

8797 Thesis Data Collection, Initial Analysis, and Management

 

 

During the winter term—after meeting the expectations outlined in the first doctoral thesis course (EDU 8796), you will immediately begin to follow the plan for data collection and early analysis outlined in your proposal.

Review the Guide to Graduation

Spring

(AprilJune)


Doctoral Thesis Course 3

8798 Thesis Data Analysis and Presentation

 

Course 3 (EDU 8797) assumes that you have met the expectations outlined in the first and second advising seminars. You will tackle the data analysis process and put together the presentation plan for your analysis. This process supports the preparation of chapter 4, outlining what will be included and how it will be presented. A clear and robust draft of the chapter will be expected at the end of the term, leaving only the final draft of chapters 4 and 5 for the final term. 

 

Summer

(JulyAugust)

Doctoral Thesis Course 4

8799 Thesis Findings and Discussion

 

You have completed your summer residency requirement. You will return to Boston to defend your thesis.

The final advising seminar entails writing the results and discussion chapters of the thesis. Since a draft of your results chapter will be completed in seminar three, the fourth seminar focuses on the discussion. If you have a nearly complete draft of the discussion when the seminar ends, you will not be required to re-enroll; rather, you will complete your work independently in conjunction with your advisor in preparation for your thesis defense in the fall term.

Tip Tip
Make sure you have reviewed the Guide to Graduation in the EdD Student Resource Center, have applied to graduate on myNEU, and have signed up for your thesis defense.

Fall

(SeptemberDecember)

 

 

 Doctoral thesis defense

Please note: The program is designed so you can complete the degree in three years by taking two classes each term, but the timeline is flexible if you choose to take them at your own pace. This sample timeline is based on a student's schedule after receiving 9 credit hours of advanced graduate credit. 


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