Forensic Accounting

Degree:
Location: Anywhere

Why Forensic Accounting?

The Graduate Certificate in Forensic Accounting is designed to help students master a range of techniques for identifying, collecting, and examining evidence of accounting fraud and abuse.

News surrounding corporate corruption has had a significant impact on businesses, particularly the accounting industry. In response, the government has enacted sweeping accounting and business laws such as the Sarbanes-Oxley 2002 legislation. Many professional organizations including the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) and the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE) have made the prevention, detection, and prosecution of fraud and accounting abuse a priority. 

This graduate certificate in forensic accounting is designed to help students apply techniques in identifying, collecting, and examining evidence, including how to identify financial statement misrepresentation, transaction reconstruction, and tax evasion. Consisting of four required courses, the program also addresses related issues such as investigative accounting and litigation support.


More Details

Unique Features

  • Designed to enhance working professional's skills in identifying and addressing financial fraud and accounting abuse.
  • Online format provides ease and flexibility for working professionals to balance their coursework and offers new forms of interaction and collaboration with faculty and fellow students.

What you'll study

General Requirements

Graduate Certificate in Forensic Accounting General Requirements

Courses should be taken in the following sequence:

ACC 6210 - Forensic Accounting Principles
4.00
ACC 6220 - Dissecting Financial Statements
4.00
ACC 6230 - Investigative Accounting and Fraud Examination
4.00
ACC 6240 - Litigation Support
4.00

Did You Know?

A graduate certificate can boost your earnings by an average of 25% (Washington Post, 2012).

Did You Know?

Certificates are the fastest-growing form of post-secondary credentials in the United States (Chronicle of Higher Education, 2012).

Average Time to Completion

1-1.5 Years

Commitment

Full-Time
Part-Time

Entry Terms

Fall
Spring
Summer
Winter